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By: Conor Bezane

 Common people do not have a monopoly on feeling hopeless and suicidal. It can happen to anyone, including celebrities.When a depressed Sinéad O’Connor sequestered herself in a New Jersey motel room in 2015, crying out for help in a 12-minute YouTube video, it was out of desperation. But the reactions from people on the internet were extreme....
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By: Courtney Davey, MA, MFT

When you care for someone who lives with Bipolar Disorder, there can be a variety of questions around how to handle discussions that involve their symptoms or their behaviors. Wanting to be sensitive and not overstep is common, and sometimes it may be necessary to bring something up, regardless of that feeling. Here are a few suggestions on how to...
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A Hug and a Whisper

July 16, 2018

By: Laura Sanscartier

In the battle against Bipolar Disorder, one often feels alone. This is nothing new. The disease is such that we are left feeling powerless. No one will ever feel the way that we feel, will never know the highs and lows, will never know the agony of suicidal ideation when things get so bad it seems there is no other way out. I have felt this way...
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By: Liz Wilson

When I did my training to become a Peer Support Specialist, I also took 20 hours of Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) Training. The idea behind a WRAP is to create a deeper understanding of when and how to help you. The key is YOU. Your normalcy, your manias, your depressions…WRAP is a written snapshot of how you look and act in...
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By: Tosha Maaks

I am what I consider a true manic these days. For me, I teeter more towards mania than depression more often than I use too. It is still a constant balancing act and I still have rough days where I have depression. However, it is not the suicidal depression that once accompanied my bipolar disorder and that is thanks to medication.At one point...
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By: Liz Wilson 

Trauma: An incident and its physiological and psychological effects on victims and/or witnesses to the event. The DSM describes 5 types of PTSD, the label most commonly associated with trauma. I want to talk about comorbid PTSD; a diagnosis given when other diagnoses exist. In my case, Bipolar Disorder and Substance Abuse Disorder.My first memory...
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By: Courtney Davey MA, MFT

Talking about Bipolar Disorder can sometimes be difficult to do with people that you care about. It can be exhausting to educate people that you care about on the way that you interact with your symptoms and the world when you experience them. It is not your job to teach every person in the world about Bipolar disorder, unless you want to be an...
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By: Rwenshaun Miller, MA, LPCA

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By: Conor Bezane

It was in rehab in 2012 that I decided to carry the flag for the mentally ill. I’d received my diagnosis of bipolar four years earlier and ended up in treatment because I was drinking two six-packs of beer or two bottles of wine — or more — every night. I was also smoking crack with homeless people a couple times a week and, for good measure,...
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By: Danielle Workman

To the Beautiful, Bold, Bipolar;The culture of today is fast paced, moving at a breakneck speed. With the technological savviness of social media sitting in the forefront of most of our minds, our culture has come to not only know but expect perfection. Anything less than perfection is deemed unworthy; a curse.Photos are edited repeatedly until...
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By: Christine Saenz

Ever since my diagnosis of Bipolar II back in 2010 I’ve worked really hard to get family and friends to understand that people with mental illness should be shown the same kindness and compassion as someone with a physical illness.When I was admitted to the psychiatric hospital for one of the worst manic episodes I had ever experienced I remember...
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By: Nancy Travers

If you’ve been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression, it’s important to understand there are many forms of depression. Basically, Bipolar Disorder involves episodes of depression and mania. Bipolar I Disorder involves severe mood swings while Bipolar II involves milder episodes of hypomania that alternate with severe...
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