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Bipolar Disorder

By Wendy Ward, Executive Director, The Youth Mental Health Project

My first experiences with mental health conditions are the reasons that I co-founded The Youth Mental Health Project. I believe that by changing the way we talk about and how we act with regard to our children’s mental health, we can create better outcomes for ourselves, our children, and future generations. That is why the International Bipolar...
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Redefining Success: Part 2

September 18, 2017

By: Megan Malfi

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By: Diane Dweller

 Parents, siblings, and spouses have written numerous books, articles, and blogs about family members coping with bipolar disorder. Hundreds of books on this manic-depression illness have been written by medical professionals and counselors. Many patients write about their challenges of living with mood swings.Q. Who does not write about the...
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What Do You Mean It's Forever?

September 15, 2017

By: Laura Sanscartier

I am 37 years old.  I have battled symptoms of bipolar disorder since I was a child, and was diagnosed when I was in my early 20s.  Essentially, I have endured and tried to “fix” this disease, even cure it, for 30 years.  I have gone to many, many, many doctors.  I have taken thousands (maybe millions?) of pills.  I have...
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By Doug Colbeth

I picked this title because the first thing you do after your acceptance of a bipolar condition is to focus on your own treatment (not others). However, after you have developed your own program for managing your condition, it is very worthwhile to reflect on those three critical types of relationships in life. I was not diagnosed until my...
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By: Christine Saenz

 I am three-time suicide attempt survivor; I know first hand what it is like to be in that dark place of feeling hopeless. Battling a mental illness can be an exhausting and lonely place. Mental illness can bully your mind into believing that you are a burden and your family and friends will be better off without you, when it simply isn’t...
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"Bipolar" Is The Wrong Word

September 5, 2017

By: James Phelps, M.D.

“Bipolar” is the wrong word. Worse than inaccurate -- it’s directly misleading:1. Depression is the main problem for most folks. Bipolar should be called “Depression Plus."2. Depression and manic symptoms frequently occur together, in “mixed states."3. Many people with “unipolar” depression also have manic symptoms.4. There is no dividing line...
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By: Danielle Workman

I’ve said it in many other posts and even in my book, but the day I received my diagnosis and was told I had Bipolar Disorder, I truly felt alone. The days that followed, the feeling remained. The more I searched online and the more I dug, the worse I felt. I longed for someone to tell me that things were going to be okay. That life wasn’t over....
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Finding Solace in Art Therapy

September 1, 2017

By: Emily McGuigan

“If I could say it in words there would be no reason to paint.” ~ Edward HopperAs an artist with Generalized Anxiety Disorder(GAD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), I have primarily used drawing and painting to help me cope with and explain traumatic or stressful events in my life, but also to discover who I am as a person. Art allows me to...
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By: Conor Bezane

There are 5.7 million bipolar people in the US, and 60 percent of them are addicts, according to the Epidemiologic Catchment Area study. Co-occurring addiction is more common in bipolar people than in any other psychiatric group. We drink and use drugs to stabilize our moods or to replicate the feelings of mania.  I was diagnosed bipolar...
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By: Michelle Vasiliu

In 2015, my first picture book, My Happy Sad Mummy, was published.My Happy Sad Mummy is a Picture Book for 3-8 year olds. It is a story that portrays the emotional response of a young girl living with a mother who has bipolar disorder.The book allows families the opportunity to engage in conversations about this illness in a sensitive and age...
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By: Danielle Workman

The day I received my diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder, I felt so alone. I remember it vividly, because it was so incredibly painful. I didn’t know anyone with Bipolar Disorder I could talk to about it. The people I knew that had anxiety and depression were so trapped in their own issues, I didn’t want to burden them with mine.Driving home in the...
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